Mix Your Own Gluten Free Flour -Learn How With This Easy (and awesome) Guide!

The Ultimate Guide to Gluten-Free Flour Mixing! #celiac #coeliac #glutenfree #grainfreeEver wished you had a little Gluten Free baking genie to turn to in the flour department?

Confusing isn’t it! I for one was super confused and just the teeniest bit stressed out in the beginning. Fret not, self-proclaimed flour genie at your service! Well, at the very least I can ease your troubles a wee bit by compiling and organising all that crazy information for you. Behold your very own gluten-free flour mix go-to guide!

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: “The World’s Best Gluten-Free Sandwich Bread Recipe”


Gluten-free baking is temperamental

I venture to say that the hardest part of baking gluten-free is finding the right flour. It’s nothing like it “used to be” where you could just pop open a packet of white flour and toss it into any recipe under the sun. Oh no, every gluten-free dish has its own suitable flour, because every gluten-free flour does its own thing.The Ultimate Guide to Gluten-Free Flour Mixing! #celiac #coeliac #glutenfree #grainfree  It’s temperamental. -A bit like me when my cakes deflate before I can say poof.

Gluten free flour mixes are all over the shops nowadays, so really it’s no problem finding the perfect mix for whatever it is you wanna cook up. The commercial flour blends are usually tried and tested and pretty awesome.. but oh my are they pricey, and by golly are the packets small. It’s twice the price for half the product most of the time, and don’t you just love how the box runs out so suddenly? Just like that, you have no flour, and you can’t very well run across the road to the little convenience shop and pick up a kilo. This usually happens to me late on a Saturday. Preferably just before guests arrive.


The solution

The solution can be mixing your own flour. It’s really not as hard as it sounds. I was admittedly a tad bit intimidated by the idea to begin with, but it makes so much sense now. I have a huge container of flour at hand, I save a few bob and I can adapt the mixes to suit my favourite recipes!

I’d like to share with you a little selection of mixes from various awesome gluten-free baking gurus, who have been wonderful enough to share their discoveries with the world. The idea is that this collection of mixes will allow you to experiment and find your own favourites.

First a little info on the different flours, starches and gums used in the mixes. You can click on the names of the different flours for more in-depth information.


 

The Ultimate Guide to Gluten-Free Flour Mixing! #celiac #coeliac #glutenfree #grainfreeThe Different Gluten-Free Flour Components:

Potato starch is made from peeled potatoes and is very fine. It helps provide a light texture in baked goods. Not to be confused with potato flour (below).

Potato flour is made from whole potatoes and absorbs a lot of water. It is heavy and should be used sparingly. Potato flour will help keep baked goods moist.

Tapioca starch has a sweet flavour and adds texture to baked goods.

Sorghum flour has a nutty, sweet flavour, and adds volume and texture when combined with a starch like say tapioca.

Soy flour has a nutty taste and is used as a thickener. The protein content of soy flour also helps substitute gluten in yeasty baked goods. Roasted soy flour has less of a “beany” taste.

Rice flour is made from finely milled rice. Brown rice flour is heavier and more nutritious than white rice flour. Ground rice is a slightly more coarsely ground variant.

Sweet rice flour or Glutinous rice (has nothing to do with gluten) is made from short grain or “sticky” rice, and has a higher carb content than normal rice flour. This makes it better suited as a thickener.

Almond meal or -flour is a flour made up of ground (and usually blanched) almonds. You can also grind almonds yourself to make fresh, raw almond meal. Nut flours add flavour, texture and nutritional value to baked goods. Almond meal contains a lot of natural almond oil and, therefore can’t substitute just any flour in your recipe. The same goes for other nut flours.

 

Corn flour or cornstarch is made from very finely ground corn. It is effective as a thickener in sauces, and to add texture to baked goods. In the US the term “corn flour” can also be used to describe Maize flour, which is a finer ground version of Polenta (below).

Corn meal is different from cornstarch, and often goes by the name of Polenta. It is yellow, and gives baked goods colour. It also adds moisture and texture.

Arrowroot flour is similar to cornstarch in quality, and the two can often be used interchangeably. It is ground from the arrowroot plant, and is popular in biscuits and cookies. Arrowroot is almost devoid of protein, and is best used in conjunction with other gluten-free flours for baking.

Buckwheat flour has a strong, bitter flavour and counts as a whole grain gluten-free flour because of its protein content. Buckwheat is well suited for baking, and is a good component in a gluten-free bread mix.

Millet flour has almost the same protein content as wheat, and for that reason serves well as a component in bread mixes. However, millet alone does not have enough binding agent. Millet has a powdery texture and a sweet flavour.

Oat flour is ground oats. The debate on whether or not oats are gluten-free is running high (quick facts about oats and gluten on this link), and the regulations vary from country to country. It is very important that you familiarise yourself with the facts before you decide to incorporate oats in your diet. For those who choose to use oats, make sure you buy only certified non-contaminated oats. Oats give a similar result to wheat in baking and is, therefore desirable. It is versatile, nutritious and high in protein.

Quinoa flour is quite coarse and has a nutty flavour. It is a nutritious and protein rich flour.

Xantan gum is made from the fermentation of glucose, sucrose or lactose, and is used as a thickener.

Guar gum is made from guar beans, and has almost 8 times the water thickening properties of cornstarch.

Pectin is derived from fruits and plants, mainly citrus fruits, and is used as a gelling agent and stabiliser.gluten-free newsletter


The Ultimate Guide to Gluten-Free Flour Mixing! #celiac #coeliac #glutenfree #grainfree

All-Purpose Flours:

The Gluten Free Lifesaver’s own flour mix:

200 g/ 7 oz Finely ground white rice flour
100 g/ 3,5 oz Buckwheat flour
100 g/ 3,5 oz Sorghum flour
300 g/ 10,6 oz Potato starch
300 g/ 10,6 oz Tapioca flour
50 g/ 1,76 oz non-fat dry milk powder (can be dropped for a dairy free option)
10 g/ 0,35 oz xantan gum

Take care to mix the different flours together thoroughly,
using an electric mixer if possible. More is more in this case.

When making your own flour mixes it is always better to use
weight rather than volume measurements!

You can find a super handy Baking Cheat Sheet on This Link.
Feel free to stick it on your kitchen wall or your Pinterest wall,
whatever suits you as long as you make good use of it!

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: “The Best Gluten-Free Crusty French Bread (Baguette) Recipe!”

Get your free printable guide to gluten-free bread baking!


Great flour mixes from other recipe developers:

250 g/ 9 oz of sorghum flour or brown rice flour
250 g/ 9 oz tapioca flour

100 g/ 3 1/2 oz almond flour
1 tsp xantan gum

(from “Gluten free baking” by Michael McCamley)

***

2 cups white rice flour
2/3 cup potato starch
1/3 cup tapioca flour

(from “Gluten free and easy” by Robyn Russell)

***

6 cups white rice flour
3 cups tapioca flour
1 1/2 cups potato starch
 2 tbsp xantan gum
1 tbsp salt

(from silvanaskitchen.com)

***

6 parts rice flour
2 parts potato flour
1 part tapioca flour

(from “EatWellLiveWell”)

***

2 parts soy flour
1 part rice flour
1 part potato flour

(from “EatWellLiveWell”)

***

4 parts soy flour
4 parts potato flour
1 part rice flour
1 part glutinous rice flour

(from “EatWellLiveWell”)

***

180 g superfine white rice flour
145 g cornstarch
85 g tapioca starch/flour
80 g superfine brown rice flour
60 g non-fat dry milk
20 g potato starch
10 g xantan gum

(Mock Cup4Cup from “Gluten-Free on a shoestring”)

***

160 g superfine brown rice flour
160 g superfine white rice flour
80 g tapioca starch/flour
80 g potato starch
20 g potato flour
18 g xantan gum
8 g pure powdered pectin (no calcium)

(Mock Better Batter from “Gluten-Free on a shoestring”)

***

200 g oat flour (certified GF,
for those who choose to include this in their diet)  

100 g millet flour
100 g buckwheat flour
300 g potato starch
300 g tapioca flour

(from “Grainmillwagon”)

***

200 g sorghum flour
200 g millet flour
300 g sweet rice flour
300 g potato starch

(from “gluten-free girl and the chef”)


The Ultimate Guide to Gluten-Free Flour Mixing! #celiac #coeliac #glutenfree #grainfree

Self-raising:

Simply add 1 1/2 tsp of gluten-free baking powder
per 250 g/ 9 oz of your chosen all-purpose flour mix.


Cake Flours:

3 cups fine ground brown rice flour
1 cup potato starch (not potato flour)
1/2 cup tapioca flour
1 1/4 tsp guar gum OR xantan gum

(from “What’s Cooking”)

***

250 g/ 9 oz brown rice flour
250 g/ 9 oz sorghum flour
250 g/ 9 oz tapioca flour

(from “Gluten free baking” by Michael McCamley)

***

1 1/4 cup superfine white rice flour
3/4 cup potato starch
1/2 cup sorghum or oat flour
1/4 cup superfine brown rice flour
2 tsp baking soda
2 tsp gluten free baking powder
2 tsp xantan gum

(from “glutenfreerecipebox”)

***

1 cup brown rice flour
1/2 cup ground arrowroot or cornstarch
1/2 cup sweet potato flour
2/3 cup potato starch
1/3 cup tapioca starch
1 tbsp potato flour
1 1/2 tsp xantan gum

(from “buenprovechoenjoyyourfoodglutenfree“)

***

1 1/4 cup (300 ml) sorghum flour
2/3 cup (150 ml) amaranth flour
2/3 cup (150 ml) brown rice flour
1/4 cup (50 ml) quinoa flour
2 tbsp (25 ml) potato starch
2 tbsp (25 ml) tapioca starch
3/4 tsp (4 ml) xantan gum
3/4 tsp (4 ml) salt

(from “glutenfreerecipebox”)

Get your free printable guide to gluten-free bread baking!


Learn more about gluten-free living here:

 



Try the poll!

70 Comments on “Mix Your Own Gluten Free Flour -Learn How With This Easy (and awesome) Guide!

    • I had been missing something like this, so I figured I’d roll up my sleves and get stuck into making one. I hope it will prove useful for a lot more people than myself!

      Like

  1. Pingback: How-to Gluten Free Flour Blend | celiac kiddo

  2. Pingback: DIY Gluten Free Flour Blend | celiac kiddo

  3. You have great information here, as a person with sever food allergies I need to get more creative, I’m allergic to nuts, potatoe, tomato (actually everything in the night shade family) buckwheat, oats, rye, citrus. You have done a lot if studying to get the info you have! If its alright I would like to cull from what you have so I can create what works for me.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Michele! Food allergies are a real challenge! Be creative with all the things you can still enjoy, and learn what works for you. There’s lots of freedom within the restrictions, and playing with your options will make your diet it easier and more satisfying, not to mention your confidence will grow.

      All the best,
      Kristine

      Like

  4. Pingback: 7 Ways To Go Gluten-Free On A Budget | Care2 Causes

  5. I am finding the flour qualities in Australia must be different to the US where most of the mixes are from. When I mix them up with the same moisture quantities (even going by weight), it works out too moist or dry. Which brands do you use in Australia with your mix?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Heather! I’m afraid I’m not familiar with the differences between Australian vs American flour brands, but I tend to use Dove’s Farm for buckwheat and ready mixes, Cole’s organic range for my quinoa, millet etc, McKenzie’s rice flours, Tasty or Cole’s potato starches, and Bob’s Red Mill now and again when I can get it.

      If you do have trouble with your baked goods coming out too dry, firstly bare in mind that gluten free baked goods need more moisture than its glutened counterparts. If you are coverting a recipe, try to add more moisture. I have made a conversion chart available on the blog. Xantan or other gums (as well as physillum husk) can help keep in the moisture. Also, I like to keep a bowl of water in the bottom of my oven when I bake bread. You can also cover your bread pan or bake bread in the slow cooker (makes really moist bread).

      The humidity will also make a difference for various types of baking. I had to adjust most of my recipes when moving from dry Norway to humid Australia. A different oven also has its way that I needed to get used to. All these factors need to be taken into account, and you can get better results from playing around with the base mixes and adding or taking away components depending on your specific needs. Just make sure you keep the protein/starch ratio fitting to what you want to use the flour mix for.

      I hope this helps! Perhaps others who read this can give some input of their own, especially those who have experience from the US with different flours?

      Thank you for your valid question Heather, and best of luck mixing your flours!

      -Kristine

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Hi. Im using bob’s mills GF all purpose baking flour in combination with tapioca flour in my banana flaxseed loaf. Ny problem is there re always tiny white dots (powdered tapioca) all over my bread. I must be doin something wrong. Pls help me

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Jan!

      I can’t say for sure why this is happening, it may be worth trying a different brand of tapioca. It could be that the brand you’re using has bigger granules through it. Try sifting it to see if larger particles can be removed. Also, make sure the tapioca flour is thoroughly mixed through the dry ingredients before you add the wet. Tapioca forms a gel, and can get lumpy if you fail to mix it well enough. If none of these work I would consider using one of the following substitutes to tapioca:
      1) 1 tablespoon of cornstarch or corn flour = 2 tablespoons of instant tapioca flour
      2) 1 tablespoon of potato starch or rice starch or flour = 2 tablespoons of instant tapioca flour
      3) 2 tablespoons of all-purpose flour = 2 tablespoons of instant tapioca
      4) 1 tablespoon of Arrowroot = 2 tablespoons of instant tapioca flour

      I hope this helps! Let me know how you go🙂
      -Kristine

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Thanks for the info, but I have a slight problem. I don’t want to use corn st arch and other starches, rice flour, tapioca flour etc. because they make your bloodsugarlevels rise quickly. I sometimes use coconut flour (special stuff), hemp flour (particular taste) and teff flour- but many times I don’t manage very well. Could you possibly help me????

    Like

  8. Pingback: The Chocolate Cupcake! | quirkymelbournian

    • Hi Becky!

      You should be able to find pectin at your normal grocery shop in the jamming section. I currently have JamSetta from FowlersVACOLA sitting in my cupboard which is calcium-free, but there are many brands that are perfectly good. I don’t really have a preference, it just happens to be the brand they carry at my local grocery store. Otherwise you can search for pectin online and buy via an online shop. Hope that helps!

      -Kristine

      Like

  9. Kristine, marvellous to have found you. I’m living in South Africa but are from Namibia originally. Thank you so much for explaining the difference between the types (potato starch en flour e.g.) Love baking and trying the better ways.
    Fantastic.
    Sarie

    Like

    • Thank you for visiting the blog Sarie! It’s really fun to learn that we have readers all over the world, and I’m so happy that you found the article useful! Best of luck with your baking, and hope to “see” you again on the blog!

      -Kristine

      Like

  10. Great site. I’m going to use your recipes as I think I may be somewhat gluten sensitive. Love your use of “two bob” but then at 75 I’m old enough to know what it means. Here’s a bit more typical Ozzie. O/seas visitor is in greengrocer’s. “may I have some of those red berries” he says. G/grocer replies “they’re not red berries, they’re black berries, they’re only red because they’re green”. Cheers

    Liked by 1 person

    • Haha, that is wonderful! Thank you for sharing that little piece of Aussie amusement🙂 I’m glad you find my recipes useful, and I hope you’ll visit often!

      All the best,
      Kristine

      Like

    • Hi Jacky,

      I am glad you found the post helpful. I have looked at your restaurant’s menu online and I can see that you have several gluten free options. Well done!

      -Kristine

      Like

    • Thanks!

      For some of these flours you can try bulk wholesalers or Indian or Asian shops who often stock different flours to our western supermarkets. Be careful however to make sure they are not cross-contaminated. You can also sometimes get flours bulk online at wholesale prices, but for the most part it seems we simply have to put up with supermarket prices.. I do buy both my cornflour, potato flour and rice flour in the regular sections of the supermarket rather than the health food section though. That does help a little.

      -Kristine

      Like

  11. Pingback: *The Cost of Being a Celiac* - celiaci glutine gratis

  12. Pingback: * The Expense of Being a Celiac *. | celiaci glutine gratis

  13. Pingback: Gluténmentes lisztkeverék házilag, xantángumi és guargumi nélkül | Csanavarázs - Öko-Eko & $$$ Megoldások

    • Hi Tom, thanks for your question. With gluten-free baking there is unfortunately not one flour that suits every purpose equally well, although you can use a “universal” flour mix and put up with its limitations. Most people like to try different variations, until they work out which mix works best for their uses. If you don’t want to try diffee ones out, and your baking isn’t very complicated, then you can either buy a ready made flour mix or adopt one from the list at random: they are all very good mixes! My favourite is The Gluten Free Lifesaver’s own mix, it’s fairly universal and will do a good job in most recipes! Hope that answers your question🙂 -Kristine

      Like

  14. Such an awesome guide, I’ve been gluten and dairy free for 10 years now and gave up on baking bread a long time ago (just couldn’t get it right). My passion came back and I stumbled across your guide and I feel its going to be a great help. Trying to bake a GF DF VEGAN loaf that actually tastes really nice, stays spongy and lasts for a few days before going hard! Wish me luck! Blessings to you and thank you so much for taking the time to get all this info together.❤❤❤

    Taurie

    Like

    • Dear Taurie, thank you for your wonderful comment! I am so happy that you find the guide useful!

      I really hope you succeed with your perfect loaf, and I’d love to hear how you go!

      All the best,
      Kristine

      Like

  15. I have a mix of gluten free flour which is self rising,( containing baking powder, white sorghum, white rice flour, tapioca starch). If I try to convert a wheat flour recipe for a lemon cake, would I add the required baking powder and soda that the recipe calls for to the gluten free flour I’m using that already contains baking powder and xanthan?

    Like

    • Hi Bernice! If your gluten-free flour is self -raising and already contains a raising agent such as baking powder, then should not have to add more. If the recipe calls for large amounts however, you can add half of the amount in the recipe to be sure. Hope that helps! -Kristine

      Like

  16. I am struggling to find a way to make a gluten free pie crust from the very few ingredients I am allowed to have. They include arrowroot flour, tapioca flour, salt-free baking powder, guar gum, oats, white rice flour, and yeast. I cannot have potato flour, any nut flours, brown rice flour, or sorghum flour. The only vegetables I can have are in the broccoli/cabbage family, zucchini, onion, and chives. I can have eggs and dairy products. Can anyone help?

    Like

    • Hi Cristy! You’ll get a super flour mix using tapioca, oat flour and rice flour. For baking you can add guar gum, dry milk powder, baking powder and an egg, and you’ve got a super cake or bread mix too! Take a look at my flour mix guide for detailed descriptions, and use the flour mix in a regular pastry recipe for a gorgeous crust🙂 Hope that helps, and I’ll leave the question open for others to answer as well! -Kristine

      Like

  17. I have an allergy to potato starch, so was wondering what combination of flour i could use to make a light gluten free bread?
    Many thanks
    Hayley

    Like

    • Hi Hayley! You can simply substitute the potato starch in my flour mix with corn starch, and you’ll get just as good a result. I recommend checking out my sandwich bread recipe and the new french baguette recipe. They make really lovely and light breads! Hope that helps🙂 -Kristine

      Like

  18. First thank you too much for your lovely infos.my question is how can i make my own flour mix from sorghum flour,corn starch,white rice flour ,white corn flour and xanthan gum.?(thats what i can find in egypt).

    Like

    • Hi Ali! You can make good flour with your ingredients. Why don’t you try: 400 g sorghum flour, 300 g sweet rice flour, 300 g corn starch, 15 g xantan gum🙂 Let me know how you go! Best of luck! -Kristine

      Like

  19. Hi
    Love your post. I I came across it by accident!….do you know where I can buy organic sweet potato flour in australia? I’m stumped! I can’t get it on Amazon or find it online. I’m in perth

    Like

    • Hi Georgie! Thanks for your kind words🙂 Ooh.. that’s a tough one. I don’t know a place off the top of my head. You might have some luck if you ask at your local health food store. Quite often they are able to order in what you need. I found sweet potato flour on this site (http://www.barryfarm.com/flours.htm) but I don’t know if they deliver to Oz. Also, you might be able to find some on iherb.com. They sometimes have specialty flours. I also found sweet potato powder on mynaturalmarket.com. I hope some of that can help you.. -Kristine

      Like

  20. I personally think you should post your recipes etc white on white. Then they would be completely impossible,to read as they are now. Did it ever occur to you that SOME people,are far sighted????

    Like

    • Hi Judi, I’m sorry that you are having troubles reading my recipes. Perhaps you should check the settings on your screen, as my blog is set to regular black on white. I also think you should check your manners. I provide a totally free service for anyone to use, and I work long hours and do my very best to help anyone who visits my site. I do however not have to put up with nasty comments. If you aren’t happy with something you are welcome to post a (polite) request, and I’ll do my best to help. If you can’t be nice then you are welcome to search for your recipes elsewhere. All the best, Kristine

      Like

  21. I have a question! I want to make a GF alternative to AP flour, but I’d like to use a mix of the flours/starches I already have in my pantry rather than go buy more. For example, can Arrowroot powder or cornstarch replace Tapioca starch/flour or Xantham gum?

    This is what I already have, can I make an AP GF flour out of any combo of these ingredients?

    – Brown Rice flour (I have LOTS of this, this is what I’d like to use up as the primary base for the flour. I don’t mind it being closer in texture to Whole Wheat flour, rather than a delicate AP flour)
    – Arrowroot flour/starch
    – Cornstarch
    – Coconut flour
    – Almond flour
    – Flaxseed meal

    Thank you!

    Like

    • Hi Kelsey! The important thing in mixing a gluten-free AP flour is that you get the balance of protein vs starch right. Rice flour is a great start, and will work well with arrowroot. Almond meal is also good for a lot of recipes, but because it has a lot of natural oil in it, you might want to adjust the amount depending on the recipe you are using. Coconut flour is great for a lot of things, but it soaks up a lot of moisture and is best used in smaller amounts unless you adjust the liquid in your recipe to suit. Flaxseed is great for keeping the moisture, and I would certainly recommend adding a tbsp or more to your baked goods. To get qualities similar to those of wheat flour I would buy some protein rich flour alternatives, such as pea flours, or buckwheat to add into your mix, or else your mix will be too heavy on the starches and might be most suitable for recipes that don’t require yeast.

      I hope that helps!

      Best regards,
      Kristine

      Like

  22. I have just purchased a pasta machine and would like to know everyones thoughts about what Gluten Free flour or Gluten Free flour mix recipe would be best to use for great taste and results. Thanks

    Like

  23. I got sent here via a link on ‘The Whoot’, to what was supposed to be a great ‘BisQuick’recipe for gluten free. Which of these recipes would be the best go to, from the several listed. I can’t afford to have 20 different flours on hand to make all of these. It would be good if each recipe perhaps had a list of what it would be best for. But thanks for compiling the list, it makes life easy to have stuff in one place.

    Like

    • Hi Lorraine, thanks for stopping by!🙂 I’ve divided the list into all-purpose, cake, and self-raising flours, and they are quite versatile. Bisquick is a sort of mix that has shortenign added to it, and although I don’t have a specific “Bisquick recipe”, quite a few of them would be suitable if you add shortening (like my own GFL mix for example). But, just to make sure you get exactly what you’re looking for as easily as possible, here’s a link to someone who does market her mix as a “Bisquick” substitute: http://www.glutenfreebaking.com/homemade-gluten-free-bisquick-recipe/ I hope that helps you! All the best, Kristine

      Like

  24. Can you give us a good mix for a crunchy fish batter. I’ve heard tapioca and rice flour is good but I don’t know quantities. Your post is exceptionally helpful. Thank you sue

    Like

    • Hi Sue🙂 You can definitely try tapioca and rice flour, but mix it with sparkling mineral water, a bit of salt and pepper and some bicarb. That should make the batter nice and crispy! I don’t have exact quantities off the top of my head, because I ususlly just wing it.. but I’ll definitely post a recipe now. You can also check out my recipe for “crispy, crunchy chicken sticks” on this link: https://thankheavens.com.au/2013/10/03/crispy-chicken-sticks/

      Hope that helps!

      -Kristine

      Like

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 15,390 other followers

%d bloggers like this: